Josserand, Judy Kathryn 1983

Josserand, Judy Kathryn. 1983. Mixtec Dialect History. (Proto-Mixtec and Modern Mixtec Text). (Doctoral dissertation, Tulane University; xv+711pp.)

@phdthesis{76972,
  author          = {Josserand, Judy Kathryn},
  pages           = {xv+711},
  school          = {Tulane University},
  title           = {Mixtec Dialect History. (Proto-Mixtec and Modern Mixtec Text)},
  year            = {1983},
  abstract        = {The Mixtec languages are members of the Mixtecan branch of the Otomanguean language family, one of the largest and most important linguistic groups of Mesoamerica. Mixtec is presently spoken by 250,000 persons living in the Mexican states of Oaxaca, Puebla and Geuerrero. A combination of the methodologies of modern dialectology and historical-comparative linguistics is applied to a large body of published and unpublished material from the Mixtec languages and dialects. A structural framework for interpreting the data is provided by the analysis and comparison of 16 modern Mixtec phonological systems. This comparison also provides support for hypotheses about the Proto-Mixtec phonological system. An overview of the reconstructed units and other phonological characteristics of Proto-Mixtec is followed by a detailed presentation of the vowel correspondences for the six Proto-Mixtec vowels and their developments into the modern varieties. Data presented in support of this reconstruction include 188 cognate sets drawn from 122 varieties of Mixtec. From the patterns of regional development revealed by this analysis and reconstruction, inferences are drawn concerning prehistoric population movements and spheres of cultural influence within the Mixtec speaking area. Stages of diversification are proposed, corresponding to the periods of action of major phonological processes. Although subgrouping by genealogical classification is not attempted, a grouping into dialect areas is achieved by a combination of diagnostic linguistic features, both phonological and lexical. These areal groupings are suggested as candidates for the reconstruction of intermediate stages between Proto-Mixtec and the modern varieties.},
  besttxt         = {ptxt2\north_america\josserand_mixtec1983v2_o.txt},
  degree          = {PhD},
  digital_formats = {PDF 24.95Mb image-only PDF},
  fn              = {north_america\josserand_mixtec1983v2_o.pdf, north_america\josserand_mixtec1983.pdf},
  hhtype          = {overview;comparative;wordlist},
  inlg            = {English [eng]},
  lgcode          = {16 singled out: Acatlán-Puebla = Mixtec-Southern Puebla [mit], Huajuapan de León-Oaxaca = Mixtec-Cacaloxtepec [miu], San Pedro Molinos-Oaxaca = Mixtec-San Miguel el Grande [mig], San Juan Coatzospan-Oaxaca = Coatzospan Mixtec [miz], Silacayoapan-Oaxaca = Silacayoapan Mixtec [mks], Santo Tomás Ocotepec-Oaxaca = Mixtec-Ocotepec [mie], San Sebastián Atatlahuca-Oaxaca, San Juan Diuxi-Oaxaca = Diuxi-Tilantongo Mixtec [xtd], Alacatlazala-Guerrero = Alacatlatzala Mixtec [mim], San Juan Mixtepec-Oaxaca = Mixtepec Mixtec [mix], San Miguel el Grande-Oaxaca = Mixtec San Miguel el Grande [mig], Santa Maria Peñoles-Oaxaca = Mixtec-Peñoles [mil], Ayutla de los Libres-Guerrero = Mixtec-Ayutla [miy], Santa Maria Jicaltepec-Oaxaca = Pinotepa Nacional Mixtec [mio], San Agustin Chayuco-Oaxaca = Mixtec-Chayuco [mih], Santiago Jamiltepec-Oaxaca = Jamiltepec Mixtec [mxt], Miscellaneous features mentioned and wordlist: Tamazola Mixtec [vmx], Tlazoyaltepec Mixtec [mqh], Juxtlahuaca Mixtec [vmc], Tututepec Mixtec [mtu], Santa Lucía Monteverde Mixtec [mdv], Soyaltepec Mixtec [vmq], Chigmecatitlán Mixtec [mii], Chayuco Mixtec [mih], Cuyamecalco Mixtec [xtu], Tacahua Mixtec [xtt], San Miguel Piedras Mixtec [xtp], Atatláhuca Mixtec [mib], Yoloxochitl Mixtec [xty], Tepeuxila Cuicatec [cux], Chazumba Mixtec [xtb], Alcozauca Mixtec [xta], Apasco-Apoala Mixtec [mip], Magdalena Peñasco Mixtec [xtm], Tijaltepec Mixtec [xtl], San Juan Teita Mixtec [xtj], Sinicahua Mixtec [xti], Western Juxtlahuaca Mixtec [jmx], Metlatónoc Mixtec [mxv], Itundujia Mixtec [mce], Yosondúa Mixtec [mpm], Huitepec Mixtec [mxs], Southwestern Tlaxiaco Mixtec [meh], Yutanduchi Mixtec [mab], Santa María Zacatepec Mixtec [mza], Northern Tlaxiaco Mixtec [xtn], Sindihui Mixtec [xts], Tezoatlán Mixtec [mxb], Northwest Oaxaca Mixtec [mxa], Tidaá Mixtec [mtx], San Juan Colorado Mixtec [mjc], Yucuañe Mixtec [mvg]},
  macro_area      = {North America},
  oclc            = {48314132},
  source          = {DAI-A 44/09, p. 2751, Mar 1984},
  src             = {hh},
  subject         = {LANGUAGE, LINGUISTICS (0290)},
  umi_id          = {8400802}
}
TY  - THES
AU  - Josserand, Judy Kathryn
PY  - 1983
DA  - 1983//
TI  - Mixtec Dialect History. (Proto-Mixtec and Modern Mixtec Text)
PB  - Tulane University
AB  - The Mixtec languages are members of the Mixtecan branch of the Otomanguean language family, one of the largest and most important linguistic groups of Mesoamerica. Mixtec is presently spoken by 250,000 persons living in the Mexican states of Oaxaca, Puebla and Geuerrero. A combination of the methodologies of modern dialectology and historical-comparative linguistics is applied to a large body of published and unpublished material from the Mixtec languages and dialects. A structural framework for interpreting the data is provided by the analysis and comparison of 16 modern Mixtec phonological systems. This comparison also provides support for hypotheses about the Proto-Mixtec phonological system. An overview of the reconstructed units and other phonological characteristics of Proto-Mixtec is followed by a detailed presentation of the vowel correspondences for the six Proto-Mixtec vowels and their developments into the modern varieties. Data presented in support of this reconstruction include 188 cognate sets drawn from 122 varieties of Mixtec. From the patterns of regional development revealed by this analysis and reconstruction, inferences are drawn concerning prehistoric population movements and spheres of cultural influence within the Mixtec speaking area. Stages of diversification are proposed, corresponding to the periods of action of major phonological processes. Although subgrouping by genealogical classification is not attempted, a grouping into dialect areas is achieved by a combination of diagnostic linguistic features, both phonological and lexical. These areal groupings are suggested as candidates for the reconstruction of intermediate stages between Proto-Mixtec and the modern varieties.
ID  - 76972
U1  - Ph.D. thesis
ER  - 
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