Degraff, Michel Anne Frederic 1992

Degraff, Michel Anne Frederic. 1992. Creole Grammars and Acquisition of Syntax: the Case of Haitian. Ann Arbor: UMI. (Doctoral dissertation, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania; 248pp.)

@phdthesis{77906,
  address               = {Ann Arbor},
  author                = {Degraff, Michel Anne Frederic},
  pages                 = {248},
  publisher             = {UMI},
  school                = {Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania},
  title                 = {Creole Grammars and Acquisition of Syntax: the Case of Haitian},
  year                  = {1992},
  abstract              = {The Haitian language emerged around the XVII century from the contact between French and a few African languages (the majority of the latter from West-Africa, the most influential being perhaps Ewe and Fon). The main objective of this dissertation is to study various syntactic properties of Haitian within the principles-and-parameters framework. In addition to its intrinsic descriptive importance, a detailed syntactic study of Haitian will advance our understanding of the still controversial nature of the creolization process. Aspects of Haitian syntax receiving scrutiny include its status as a null-subject language, its Tense-Mood-Aspect system, its long-distance subject extraction properties, its serial verb constructions, the patterns through which the language expresses predication, the properties of its sentential negation marker, the presence of a resumptive non-verbal pro-predicate, etc. Beyond contributing to the elucidation of Haitian syntax and of some larger, theoretical issues, the present work views a subset of the above characteristics as diachronically intriguing: they instantiate properties through which Haitian appears to differ from both its superstrate and its major substrates. Using insights from these analyses, I briefly investigate possible links between processes of syntax acquisition and the genesis of Creole grammars.},
  adviser               = {Marcus, Mitchell P.; Kroch, Anthony S.},
  besttxt               = {ptxt2\north_america\degraff_haitian1992_o.txt},
  cfn                   = {north_america\degraff_haitian1992_o.pdf},
  class_loc             = {PM7831},
  degree                = {PhD},
  delivered             = {north_america\degraff_haitian1992_o.pdf},
  digital_formats       = {PDF 8.65Mb image-only PDF},
  document_type         = {B},
  fn                    = {north_america\degraff_haitian1992.pdf, north_america\degraff_haitian1992_o.pdf, north_america\degraff _haitian1993_o.pdf},
  hhtype                = {specific_feature},
  inlg                  = {English [eng]},
  lgcode                = {Haitian [hat] (computerized assignment from "haitian")},
  macro_area            = {North America},
  mpi_eva_library_shelf = {PM 7831 DEG 2007},
  mpifn                 = {haitian_degraff1993_o.pdf},
  oclc                  = {857222323},
  source                = {DAI-A 53/11, p. 3886, May 1993},
  src                   = {hh, mpieva},
  subject               = {LANGUAGE, LINGUISTICS (0290); LANGUAGE, MODERN (0291); PSYCHOLOGY, GENERAL (0621)},
  subject_headings      = {Creole dialects–Grammar, Creole dialects–Syntax, Creole dialects–Grammar – Creole dialects–Syntax},
  umi_id                = {9308555}
}
TY  - THES
AU  - Degraff, Michel Anne Frederic
PY  - 1992
DA  - 1992//
TI  - Creole Grammars and Acquisition of Syntax: the Case of Haitian
PB  - Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania
CY  - Ann Arbor
AB  - The Haitian language emerged around the XVII century from the contact between French and a few African languages (the majority of the latter from West-Africa, the most influential being perhaps Ewe and Fon). The main objective of this dissertation is to study various syntactic properties of Haitian within the principles-and-parameters framework. In addition to its intrinsic descriptive importance, a detailed syntactic study of Haitian will advance our understanding of the still controversial nature of the creolization process. Aspects of Haitian syntax receiving scrutiny include its status as a null-subject language, its Tense-Mood-Aspect system, its long-distance subject extraction properties, its serial verb constructions, the patterns through which the language expresses predication, the properties of its sentential negation marker, the presence of a resumptive non-verbal pro-predicate, etc. Beyond contributing to the elucidation of Haitian syntax and of some larger, theoretical issues, the present work views a subset of the above characteristics as diachronically intriguing: they instantiate properties through which Haitian appears to differ from both its superstrate and its major substrates. Using insights from these analyses, I briefly investigate possible links between processes of syntax acquisition and the genesis of Creole grammars.
ID  - 77906
U1  - Ph.D. thesis
ER  - 
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