John Lynch 2016

John Lynch. 2016. Malakula internal subgrouping: Phonological evidence. Oceanic Linguistics 55. 399-431.

@article{550488,
  author   = {John Lynch},
  journal  = {Oceanic Linguistics},
  number   = {2},
  pages    = {399-431},
  title    = {Malakula internal subgrouping: Phonological evidence},
  url      = {https://muse.jhu.edu/article/640593},
  volume   = {55},
  year     = {2016},
  abstract = {\textlessp\textgreaterThe languages of Malakula belong to the Central Vanuatu subgroup of Southern Oceanic. Although many of them are not well described grammatically or lexicographically, there is sufficient information available to attempt a preliminary classification. Building on earlier work by Tryon and Clark, evidence of a phonological nature will be presented below to show that there appear to be three major lower-order groupings of Malakula languages: a Northern subgroup, an Eastern linkage, and a Western linkage. There is also some evidence that all Malakula languages probably belong to a single grouping exclusive of other Central Vanuatu languages, though this evidence is not very strong.\textless/p\textgreater},
  doi      = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/ol.2016.0019},
  hhtype   = {overview;comparative},
  inlg     = {English [eng]},
  src      = {evobib, hh}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Lynch, John
PY  - 2016
DA  - 2016//
TI  - Malakula internal subgrouping: Phonological evidence
JO  - Oceanic Linguistics
SP  - 399
EP  - 431
VL  - 55
IS  - 2
AB  - \textlessp\textgreaterThe languages of Malakula belong to the Central Vanuatu subgroup of Southern Oceanic. Although many of them are not well described grammatically or lexicographically, there is sufficient information available to attempt a preliminary classification. Building on earlier work by Tryon and Clark, evidence of a phonological nature will be presented below to show that there appear to be three major lower-order groupings of Malakula languages: a Northern subgroup, an Eastern linkage, and a Western linkage. There is also some evidence that all Malakula languages probably belong to a single grouping exclusive of other Central Vanuatu languages, though this evidence is not very strong.\textless/p\textgreater
UR  - https://muse.jhu.edu/article/640593
UR  - https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/ol.2016.0019
DO  - http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/ol.2016.0019
ID  - 550488
ER  - 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<modsCollection xmlns="http://www.loc.gov/mods/v3">
<mods ID="550488">
    <titleInfo>
        <title>Malakula internal subgrouping</title>
        <subTitle>Phonological evidence</subTitle>
    </titleInfo>
    <name type="personal">
        <namePart type="given">John</namePart>
        <namePart type="family">Lynch</namePart>
        <role>
            <roleTerm authority="marcrelator" type="text">author</roleTerm>
        </role>
    </name>
    <originInfo>
        <dateIssued>2016</dateIssued>
    </originInfo>
    <typeOfResource>text</typeOfResource>
    <genre>journal article</genre>
    <relatedItem type="host">
        <titleInfo>
            <title>Oceanic Linguistics</title>
        </titleInfo>
        <originInfo>
            <issuance>continuing</issuance>
        </originInfo>
        <genre authority="marcgt">periodical</genre>
        <genre>academic journal</genre>
    </relatedItem>
    <abstract>\textlessp\textgreaterThe languages of Malakula belong to the Central Vanuatu subgroup of Southern Oceanic. Although many of them are not well described grammatically or lexicographically, there is sufficient information available to attempt a preliminary classification. Building on earlier work by Tryon and Clark, evidence of a phonological nature will be presented below to show that there appear to be three major lower-order groupings of Malakula languages: a Northern subgroup, an Eastern linkage, and a Western linkage. There is also some evidence that all Malakula languages probably belong to a single grouping exclusive of other Central Vanuatu languages, though this evidence is not very strong.\textless/p\textgreater</abstract>
    <identifier type="citekey">550488</identifier>
    <identifier type="doi">http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/ol.2016.0019</identifier>
    <location>
        <url>https://muse.jhu.edu/article/640593</url>
    </location>
    <part>
        <date>2016</date>
        <detail type="volume"><number>55</number></detail>
        <detail type="issue"><number>2</number></detail>
        <extent unit="page">
            <start>399</start>
            <end>431</end>
        </extent>
    </part>
</mods>
</modsCollection>