Broadbent, Judith M. 2008

Broadbent, Judith M. 2008. t-to-r in West Yorkshire English. English Language and Linguistics 12. 141–168.

@article{468850,
  author   = {Broadbent, Judith M.},
  journal  = {English Language and Linguistics},
  number   = {01},
  pages    = {141–168},
  title    = {t-to-r in West Yorkshire English},
  volume   = {12},
  year     = {2008},
  abstract = {This article investigates t-to-r in West Yorkshire (WY) English and traces its course from a productive process in the nineteenth century to a lexically restricted fossil in contemporary WY. Nineteenth-century sources suggest that by the end of that century this process was already in decline. During the course of the twentieth century t-glottalling became a feature of the variety and so this article explores the possibility that as the frequency of use of t-glottalling increased, this would quickly overshadow t-to-r usage. Paradoxically, frequency of use is also responsible for the t-to-r phenomenon manifested today. More specifically, t-to-r remains in a small group of frequent words which are related by phonological shape. As a consequence of their frequency and shape, they have lexical strength and this is why a t-to-r fossil is maintained in WY today.},
  doi      = {10.1017/S1360674307002523},
  src      = {haspelmath}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Broadbent, Judith M.
PY  - 2008
DA  - 2008//
TI  - t-to-r in West Yorkshire English
JO  - English Language and Linguistics
SP  - 141
EP  - 168
VL  - 12
IS  - 01
AB  - This article investigates t-to-r in West Yorkshire (WY) English and traces its course from a productive process in the nineteenth century to a lexically restricted fossil in contemporary WY. Nineteenth-century sources suggest that by the end of that century this process was already in decline. During the course of the twentieth century t-glottalling became a feature of the variety and so this article explores the possibility that as the frequency of use of t-glottalling increased, this would quickly overshadow t-to-r usage. Paradoxically, frequency of use is also responsible for the t-to-r phenomenon manifested today. More specifically, t-to-r remains in a small group of frequent words which are related by phonological shape. As a consequence of their frequency and shape, they have lexical strength and this is why a t-to-r fossil is maintained in WY today.
UR  - https://doi.org/10.1017/S1360674307002523
DO  - 10.1017/S1360674307002523
ID  - 468850
ER  - 
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