Haiman, John 1999

Haiman, John. 1999. Auxiliation in Khmer the Case of Baan. Studies in Language 23. 149-172. Amsterdam/Philadephia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

@article{178646,
  address    = {Amsterdam/Philadephia},
  author     = {Haiman, John},
  journal    = {Studies in Language},
  number     = {1},
  pages      = {149-172},
  publisher  = {John Benjamins Publishing Company},
  title      = {Auxiliation in Khmer the Case of Baan},
  url        = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/sl.23.1.06hai},
  volume     = {23},
  year       = {1999},
  abstract   = {From a typological perspective, the most striking — and perhaps the only noteworthy — feature of the auxiliation of the main verb baan 'get' in Khmer is that it migrates from V2 to V1 position, contravening the general tendency for grammatical morphemes to remain frozen in the same position where the words from which they originate are found. It may be that the reason for this migration is, ultimately, prosodic: Khmer is an iambic language; hence, it is an exclusively prefixing language; and hence it is a language in which unstressed elements are attracted into some prefixed position. It is possible that Wackernagel's Law, following which unstressed elements are attracted into a suffixing position (typically, sentence-second) may be a typological parameter, rather than a universal. In exclusively prefixing languages like Khmer, which are admittedly very rare, the corresponding migration may be into initial position.},
  doi        = {10.1075/sl.23.1.06hai},
  inlg       = {English [eng]},
  issn       = {0378-4177},
  languageid = {614},
  lgcode     = {Cambodian (autotyp: 614 khm cent1989) = Central Khmer [khm]},
  macro_area = {Eurasia},
  src        = {autotyp, benjamins, zurich},
  zurichcode = {Khmer (Central) [KMR]}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Haiman, John
PY  - 1999
DA  - 1999//
TI  - Auxiliation in Khmer the Case of Baan
JO  - Studies in Language
SP  - 149
EP  - 172
VL  - 23
IS  - 1
PB  - John Benjamins Publishing Company
CY  - Amsterdam/Philadephia
AB  - From a typological perspective, the most striking — and perhaps the only noteworthy — feature of the auxiliation of the main verb baan ’get’ in Khmer is that it migrates from V2 to V1 position, contravening the general tendency for grammatical morphemes to remain frozen in the same position where the words from which they originate are found. It may be that the reason for this migration is, ultimately, prosodic: Khmer is an iambic language; hence, it is an exclusively prefixing language; and hence it is a language in which unstressed elements are attracted into some prefixed position. It is possible that Wackernagel’s Law, following which unstressed elements are attracted into a suffixing position (typically, sentence-second) may be a typological parameter, rather than a universal. In exclusively prefixing languages like Khmer, which are admittedly very rare, the corresponding migration may be into initial position.
SN  - 0378-4177
UR  - https://doi.org/10.1075/sl.23.1.06hai
DO  - 10.1075/sl.23.1.06hai
ID  - 178646
ER  - 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<modsCollection xmlns="http://www.loc.gov/mods/v3">
<mods ID="178646">
    <titleInfo>
        <title>Auxiliation in Khmer the Case of Baan</title>
    </titleInfo>
    <name type="personal">
        <namePart type="given">John</namePart>
        <namePart type="family">Haiman</namePart>
        <role>
            <roleTerm authority="marcrelator" type="text">author</roleTerm>
        </role>
    </name>
    <originInfo>
        <dateIssued>1999</dateIssued>
    </originInfo>
    <typeOfResource>text</typeOfResource>
    <genre>journal article</genre>
    <relatedItem type="host">
        <titleInfo>
            <title>Studies in Language</title>
        </titleInfo>
        <originInfo>
            <issuance>continuing</issuance>
            <publisher>John Benjamins Publishing Company</publisher>
            <place>
                <placeTerm type="text">Amsterdam/Philadephia</placeTerm>
            </place>
        </originInfo>
        <genre authority="marcgt">periodical</genre>
        <genre>academic journal</genre>
        <identifier type="issn">0378-4177</identifier>
    </relatedItem>
    <abstract>From a typological perspective, the most striking — and perhaps the only noteworthy — feature of the auxiliation of the main verb baan ’get’ in Khmer is that it migrates from V2 to V1 position, contravening the general tendency for grammatical morphemes to remain frozen in the same position where the words from which they originate are found. It may be that the reason for this migration is, ultimately, prosodic: Khmer is an iambic language; hence, it is an exclusively prefixing language; and hence it is a language in which unstressed elements are attracted into some prefixed position. It is possible that Wackernagel’s Law, following which unstressed elements are attracted into a suffixing position (typically, sentence-second) may be a typological parameter, rather than a universal. In exclusively prefixing languages like Khmer, which are admittedly very rare, the corresponding migration may be into initial position.</abstract>
    <identifier type="citekey">178646</identifier>
    <identifier type="doi">10.1075/sl.23.1.06hai</identifier>
    <part>
        <date>1999</date>
        <detail type="volume"><number>23</number></detail>
        <detail type="issue"><number>1</number></detail>
        <extent unit="page">
            <start>149</start>
            <end>172</end>
        </extent>
    </part>
</mods>
</modsCollection>