Salisbury, Mary C. 2002

Salisbury, Mary C. 2002. A grammar of Pukapukan. (Doctoral dissertation, University of Auckland; xxiii+709pp.)

@phdthesis{126278,
  author     = {Salisbury, Mary C.},
  pages      = {xxiii+709},
  school     = {University of Auckland},
  title      = {A grammar of Pukapukan},
  url        = {http://lear.unive.it/jspui/handle/11707/2344},
  year       = {2002},
  abstract   = {This study is a descriptive grammar of Pukapukan, the language of one of the Northern Cook Islands, which is spoken by approximately 4,500 people in various communities in the Cook Islands, Australia and New Zeland. The main focus of the thesis is a synchronic analysis of the Pukapukan language as spoken today, although occasionally comparative comments are made, both of a diachronic nature comparing the language spoken today with the language of the past, as well as externally, making comparisons with other Polynesian languages.},
  besttxt    = {ptxt2\papua\salisbury_pukapukan2002_o.txt},
  cfn        = {papua\salisbury_pukapukan2002_o.pdf},
  fn         = {papua\salisbury_pukapukan2002_o.pdf, papua\salisbury_pukapukan2002.pdf},
  hhtype     = {grammar},
  inlg       = {English [eng]},
  lgcode     = {Pukapuka [pkp]},
  macro_area = {Papunesia},
  oclc       = {805828892},
  src        = {evobib, hh}
}
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AU  - Salisbury, Mary C.
PY  - 2002
DA  - 2002//
TI  - A grammar of Pukapukan
PB  - University of Auckland
AB  - This study is a descriptive grammar of Pukapukan, the language of one of the Northern Cook Islands, which is spoken by approximately 4,500 people in various communities in the Cook Islands, Australia and New Zeland. The main focus of the thesis is a synchronic analysis of the Pukapukan language as spoken today, although occasionally comparative comments are made, both of a diachronic nature comparing the language spoken today with the language of the past, as well as externally, making comparisons with other Polynesian languages.
UR  - http://lear.unive.it/jspui/handle/11707/2344
ID  - 126278
U1  - Ph.D. thesis
ER  - 
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