Torben Andersen 2006

Torben Andersen. 2006. [ATR] reversal in Jumjum. Diachronica 23. 3-28. Amsterdam/Philadephia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

@article{11378,
  address    = {Amsterdam/Philadephia},
  author     = {Torben Andersen},
  journal    = {Diachronica},
  number     = {1},
  pages      = {3-28},
  publisher  = {John Benjamins Publishing Company},
  title      = {[ATR] reversal in Jumjum},
  url        = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/dia.23.1.03and},
  volume     = {23},
  year       = {2006},
  abstract   = {Jumjum, a Western Nilotic language, has an eight-vowel system divided into two sets by the feature [ATR] (Advanced Tongue Root), which is the basis of vowel harmony. A comparison with other Western Nilotic languages shows that (i) this vowel system goes back to a ten-vowel system in Proto-Western Nilotic (PWN), (ii) PWN high [−ATR] vowels have become high [+ATR] vowels in Jumjum, and (iii) conversely, PWN high [+ATR] vowels have become high [−ATR] vowels in Jumjum. The sequence of changes that resulted in this [ATR] reversal in Jumjum relative to PWN provides a historical explanation of synchronically odd, grammatically conditioned vowel-quality alternations in this language.},
  doi        = {10.1075/dia.23.1.03and},
  fn         = {africa\andersen_jumjum2006v2.pdf, africa\andersen_jumjum2006.pdf},
  hhtype     = {comparative;minimal},
  inlg       = {English [eng]},
  issn       = {0176-4225},
  keywords   = {Jumjum, Mayak, Mabaan, sound change, ATR, vowel system, vowel harmony, vowel alternation, Western Nilotic, Burun},
  lgcode     = {Jumjum [jum]},
  macro_area = {Africa},
  src        = {benjamins, hh}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Andersen, Torben
PY  - 2006
DA  - 2006//
TI  - [ATR] reversal in Jumjum
JO  - Diachronica
SP  - 3
EP  - 28
VL  - 23
IS  - 1
PB  - John Benjamins Publishing Company
CY  - Amsterdam/Philadephia
KW  - Jumjum, Mayak, Mabaan, sound change, ATR, vowel system, vowel harmony, vowel alternation, Western Nilotic, Burun
AB  - Jumjum, a Western Nilotic language, has an eight-vowel system divided into two sets by the feature [ATR] (Advanced Tongue Root), which is the basis of vowel harmony. A comparison with other Western Nilotic languages shows that (i) this vowel system goes back to a ten-vowel system in Proto-Western Nilotic (PWN), (ii) PWN high [−ATR] vowels have become high [+ATR] vowels in Jumjum, and (iii) conversely, PWN high [+ATR] vowels have become high [−ATR] vowels in Jumjum. The sequence of changes that resulted in this [ATR] reversal in Jumjum relative to PWN provides a historical explanation of synchronically odd, grammatically conditioned vowel-quality alternations in this language.
SN  - 0176-4225
UR  - https://doi.org/10.1075/dia.23.1.03and
DO  - 10.1075/dia.23.1.03and
ID  - 11378
ER  - 
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    <abstract>Jumjum, a Western Nilotic language, has an eight-vowel system divided into two sets by the feature [ATR] (Advanced Tongue Root), which is the basis of vowel harmony. A comparison with other Western Nilotic languages shows that (i) this vowel system goes back to a ten-vowel system in Proto-Western Nilotic (PWN), (ii) PWN high [−ATR] vowels have become high [+ATR] vowels in Jumjum, and (iii) conversely, PWN high [+ATR] vowels have become high [−ATR] vowels in Jumjum. The sequence of changes that resulted in this [ATR] reversal in Jumjum relative to PWN provides a historical explanation of synchronically odd, grammatically conditioned vowel-quality alternations in this language.</abstract>
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