Language: Horuru

Classification

This entry has been retired and is featured here only for bookkeeping purposes. Either the entry has been replaced with one or more more accurate entries or it has been retired because it was based on a misunderstanding to begin with.

E16 has a separate entry for Horuru [hrr], but Horuru is known to fall under the language subsumed in the Yalahatan [jal] entry ( James T. Collins 1983 ). See also: Yalahatan-Haruru-Awaiya [jal].

Retired in ISO 639-3: Merged into the code for Yalahatan [jal]

  • Change request: 2011-086
  • ISO 639-3: hrr
  • Name: Horuru
  • Reason: merge
  • Effective: 2012-02-03

Excerpt from change request document:

The original criteria for including Horuru in the ethnologue as a separate language seem to be outweighed by the data that suggests that the name is Haruru and is simply a dialect of Yalahatan. Since the only reference for Horuru is Voegelin 1965 which is somewhat of a survey of several languages and the only note about Horuru is that it may be an alternate for another languoage or extinct, the original inclusion of Horuru seems to be a little weak. Yalahatan, which is spoken in only two villages (Yalahatan and Haruru), matches well with the classification of Horuru, both being in the Three Rivers linguistic grouping. The geographic location of Horuru is simply Central Maluku, Seram which is home to several languages, one of which isYalahatan. Since there's no language polygon, the location could be anywhere on the island of Seram, but nowhere else in Seram is there a village by the name Horuru or a tribe that goes by that name (based on the government statistic data from 2000). The closest to the name Horuru is the village Haruru which speaks a dialect of the Yalahatan language (Sakiyama 1999 and Beckley personal communication).

References

Details Name Title Any field ca Year Pages Doctype ca Provider da